Certified Wheat Seed

Certified seed varieties from WestBred® wheat give you performance you can feel confident about, with less work and more profit potential. Certified seed has proven to offer an average yield increase of 5 bushels an acre.*

What is Certified Seed?

Certified Seed is wheat seed of a single variety that has passed inspection. It contains no other crops, no foreign material and is absent of certain seed-borne diseases. Certified Seed must meet strict quality standards proving it has yield potential. And it has offered an average yield increase of 5 bushels an acre.*

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Stop Saving. Start Earning.

While planting saved seed might seem like a money-saver, it can have an impact on your long term profitability because saved seed is more vulnerable to crop disease and performance loss. Certified Seed makes your dollar go further with better performance potential and varietal purity. Calculate the yield advantages of Certified Seed with our Profitability Calculator.

 

Calculate your profit potential with the Wheat Profitability Calculator.

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Click here to view the WestBred wheat single-use license agreement for limited-use varieties.

 

*Net revenue gain calculated as the difference in average revenue response across seed sizes ranging from 9,000 to 18,000 seeds per pound assuming an average seed cost of $18 per hundredweight for Certified Seed at 94% pure-live seed; $7.46 for saved seed at 88% pure-live seed; a seeding rate of 100 pounds per acre; a target plant stand of 1,000,000 plants per acre; a target yield of 80 bushels per acre; an average yield advantage of 5 bushels per acre for Certified Seed and a wheat price of $3.50 per bushel.

 

**Monsanto Market Probe Survey, 2015

 

Individual results may vary, and performance may vary from location to location and from year to year. This result may not be an indicator of results you may obtain as local growing, soil, and weather conditions may vary. Growers should evaluate data from multiple locations and years whenever possible.